Staff SGT.
Kevin J. McEnroe

 

Staff Sgt. Kevin J. McEnroe was born, July 8, 1986, and was killed in action, Nov. 4, 2016, while supporting operations in Jordan. McEnroe was a native of Tucson, Arizona.

McEnroe deployed five times in support of Operation Enduring Freedom and other contingency operations.

 

He enjoyed working on cars and was a skilled guitar player. McEnroe attended college at the University of Colorado prior to joining the Army.

 

He enlisted in the U.S. Army, April 7, 2008, and attended Basic Combat Training at Fort Benning, Georgia. He later attended and graduated the Basic Airborne Course, Sept. 6, 2008, and then attended Special Forces Assessment and Selection at Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

 

He graduated from the Special Forces Qualification Course as a Special Forces communications sergeant, December 16, 2011. McEnroe served in 3rd Battalion, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne) Fort Campbell, Kentucky.

 

His military education includes the Combat Diver Qualification Course; Special Operations Terminal Attack Controller Course; Special Forces Qualification Course; Advance Leader Course; Basic Leader Course; Survival, Evasion, Resistance, and Escape Course; and the Basic Airborne Course.

 

McEnroe’s awards and decorations include the Army Commendation Medal, the Army Achievement Medal, the Army Good Conduct Medal (2nd Award), the NATO Service Medal; the National Defense Service Medal, the Afghanistan Campaign Medal with Campaign Star, the Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal, the Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, the Noncommissioned Officer Professional Development Ribbon (Numeral 2), the Army Service Ribbon, the Special Forces Tab, Combat Diver Qualification Badge and the Parachutist Badge.

 

McEnroe was posthumously awarded the Bronze Star Medal, Purple Heart, Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Meritorious Service Medal, and Combat Infantryman Badge.

                          - SINE PARI -

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Sgt. First Class
Ryan Allen Gloyer

This month we honor SFC Ryan Allen Gloyer, April 6th 1982 - November 3rd 2016.

Ryan grew up in Pennsylvania hearing war stories from his D-day veteran grandpa. At an early age his mother got him a hat that had “Special Forces” written on it that he wore until it started to fall apart, then saved forever since. He was a highly involved child through school - participating in many varsity level sports as well as being apart of high school plays/musicals. This all would continue into college, where he graduated, Magna Cum Laude, with a degree in Psychology and Early education - he would also get his teaching certification completing his student teaching at Greenville elementary. Ryan was described as highly charismatic, animated and a fun-loving person. He had the ability to make friends wherever he went, in whatever social circles he found himself in. His ability to make anyone laugh through singing, dance or impersonations always brought a smile to anyone’s face around him.

After his education Ryan enlisted in the army and even though possessing a degree, decided to be enlisted because he saw that was more focused on being a soldier and that’s what he wanted out of the military. The soldier experience. He attempted Special Forces Assessment and Selection three times before making it through. Within the time before being selected he served honorably with the 82nd deploying twice to Afghanistan where he earned the bronze star w/ valor. In service Ryan was still the same kid from high school with a knack to make people laugh - but was now described as dedicated, courageous and self-disciplined.

SFC Gloyer, Ryan Allen Gloyer, was a role model to many. His presence both on and off the battlefield is surely missed.

We honor you, Ryan.

De Oppresso Liber

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Master Sgt.

Jonathan J. Dunbar

Master Sgt. Jonathan J. Dunbar, assigned to Headquarters, U.S. Army Special Operations Command, died March 30, 2018, from wounds received during combat operations near Manbij, Syria. He was deployed in support of Operation Inherent Resolve.

 

Dunbar, 36, of Austin, Texas, enlisted in the U.S. Army as an infantryman in May 2005. He completed his initial entry training at Fort Benning, Georgia. His first assignment was with C Company, 1st Battalion, 325th Airborne Infantry Regiment, Fort Bragg, North Carolina, where he served as a machine gunner, fire team leader, and squad leader. During his time with the 325th he deployed once to Afghanistan and once to Iraq in support of combat operations. In November of 2009, he transitioned to C Company, 2nd Battalion, 38th Cavalry Regiment (Long Range Surveillance), Fort Hood, Texas, where he served for four years as a squad leader. During his time in Fort Hood, he deployed to Iraq in support of combat operations.

 

In 2013, Dunbar was assigned to Headquarters, U.S. Special Operations Command, where he served as a team member and deployed three times in support of combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan.

 

Dunbar’s military education includes the Basic Airborne Course, Combat Lifesaver Course, Basic Leader Course, Ranger School, Advanced Leaders Course, Pathfinder Course, Static Line Jumpmaster Course, Advanced Land Navigation Course, Senior Leaders Course, the Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape (SERE) Course, the Military Free-Fall Jumpmaster Course, and the Special Forces Sniper Course.

 

Master Sergeant Dunbar’s awards and decorations include the Bronze Star Medal (3rd Award), the Army Commendation Medal (3 OLC), the Army Achievement Medal (5 OLC), the Good Conduct Medal (5), the National Defense Service Medal, the Afghanistan Campaign Medal (2 Bronze Service Stars), the Iraq Campaign Medal (2 Bronze Service Stars), the Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal, the Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, the Noncommissioned Officer Professional Development Ribbon (Numeral 3), the Army Service Ribbon, the Overseas Service Ribbon (2), the NATO Medal, the Ranger Tab, the Combat Infantryman Badge, the Expert Infantryman Badge, the Pathfinder Badge, the Military Freefall Jumpmaster Badge, and the Parachutist Badge.

 

-SINE PARI-

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Sergeant

Cameron A. Meddock

Sgt. Cameron A. Meddock, 26, of Spearman, Texas, died Jan. 17, 2019, in Landstuhl, Germany, as a result of wounds sustained from small arms fire on Jan. 12, 2019, in Badghis Province, Afghanistan.

“Sergeant Cameron Meddock is one of America’s precious Sons. The entire Nation should strive to emulate the Warrior, Patriot and Husband that Cameron was. The 75th Ranger Regiment will forever honor Sergeant Cameron Meddock and his family will forever be a member of our Ranger family,” said Colonel Brandon Tegtmeier, Commander of the 75th Ranger Regiment.
Meddock enlisted in the U.S. Army November 14, 2014.

 

He completed One Station Unit Training as an Infantryman, the Basic Airborne Course and the Ranger Assessment and Selection Program 1 at Fort Benning, Georgia.

Lieutenant Colonel Rob McChrystal, Commander of 2nd Ranger Battalion further stated that “Sergeant Cameron Meddock was a phenomenal Ranger, and his selfless service represents the very best of our great Nation. He will be missed dearly and the 2nd Ranger Battalion offers its sincerest condolences to his family.”

Following successful completion of Ranger Assessment and Selection Program Level 1, Meddock was assigned to Company A, 2nd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment where he served as a machine gunner, automatic rifleman, gun team leader and most recently as a fire team leader.

His military education includes the U.S. Army Ranger Course, Basic Airborne Course, Basic Leader Course, and Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape Course

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Meddock’s awards include a Purple Heart, a Joint-Service Commendation for Combat, the Army Achievement Medal with two Oak Leaf Clusters, Army Good Conduct Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Afghanistan Campaign Medal with Campaign Star, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Army Service Ribbon, Overseas Service Ribbon, and the NATO Medal. He was on his second deployment in support of Operation Resolute Support.

Meddock’s decorations include the Ranger Tab, Parachutists Badge, Expert Infantryman’s Badge, Combat Infantryman’s Badge, and the Expert Marksmanship Qualification Badge for a Rifle.

ONE FOR THE AIRBORNE RANGER IN THE SKY!


RANGERS LEAD THE WAY! 

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Sergeant

Tyler A. Juden

Tyler Juden was a beloved son, brother, friend, and leader. He was the epitome of what a Sniper should be at any level within the United States Military.


Tyler joined the United States Army in 2004 enlisting as an Airborne Infantryman. After
completion of One Station Unit Training and Airborne School at Fort Benning, Georgia he was assigned to the 82 nd Airborne Division’s 4th Brigade Combat Team at Fort Bragg, North Carolina
where he served as a Sniper in Charlie Troop, 4th Squadron, 73rd Cavalry Regiment. He completed a 15 month deployment to Afghanistan as a sniper with the unit. Upon returning to Fort Bragg, he took over as the Sniper section leader and built his own seven man section from
the ground up to prepare for the unit’s upcoming deployment to Afghanistan.


Tyler was your stereotypical Sniper. He grew up in rural Arkansas City, Kansas spending much of his time outdoors hunting, fishing and shooting with his father. He was lauded as a great student, and a great athlete throughout his childhood. His passion for marksmanship began at an early age and he was an avid competitive shooter. When Tyler was 13 he attended the NRA Whittington Center in Raton, New Mexico and returned the following year as an instructor. His passion for the shooting sports and outdoors was immense.
He aspired to become a Sniper early on in his career and is a graduate of the United States Army Sniper School. His impact on the 82 nd Airborne and the Sniper community was immeasurable. He brought so much knowledge and passion to work, and planned to take that passion to the
classroom and become a teacher upon completion of his service.

 

SGT Tyler Juden was killed in action September 12th 2009 in Turan, Afghanistan by enemy small-arms fire.


Tyler’s legacy still lives on though. In 2010 his family established the Tyler Juden Youth
Shooting Scholarship, sends 2 young shooters from Cowley County, Kansas to the NRA Whittington Center to attend the NRA Adventure Camp. The recipients are selected based on the results of the Tyler Juden Memorial Youth Hunter Education Challenge. This competition includes marksmanship challenges including shotgun, rifle, black powder, and archery as well as a written exam. A second scholarship was established at Tyler’s beloved Arkansas City High School. The Arkansas City High School Student Council funds this scholarship each year and it goes to a deserving member of the senior class. On January 22 nd 2020 House Bill 2431 was
passed and the SGT Tyler A. Juden memorial bridge was established in his memory on US Highway 166 in Cowley County.


He will not be forgotten.

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The Hall of Hero's

“That our brothers and sisters are never forgotten”

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Sgt. 
Adam C. Schoeller

Sgt. Adam Schoeller,

The man, the myth, the legend of a heavy lift crew chief was the embodiment of what a leader should be. More so than that, he was a damn good person who wouldn’t hesitate to help a new check in to the unit obtain proficiency in their field, help them take advantage of resources that were offered by the Marine Corps, or recognize that someone was having an off day and cheer them up.

Back in 2011, I was new to HMH-464, I had just come from a neighboring unit and was treated like trash by those guys, and that was instantly our “common enemy” so to speak. He and I had some shared history about the prior unit and were able to easily bond over it. At the time Adam was a Cpl, and I was just promoted to LCpl. During our time on night crew we had extensive time working together getting aircraft ready for mission, or doing some nonsense training class at the ass crack of dawn that no one wanted to do (101 days of summer etc..) but without fail, Adam would always find a way to make stuff like that tolerable. He just had that aura about him.

I might not know much about his past prior to meeting him other than dude was an absolute stud on deployments, I might not have known much about his family other than he was married and loved his wife to death, but what I did know is that every time I was around Adam, it was a damn good time. I never saw him in a bad mood which was weird considering how many times we would get bent over on maintenance or flights, he was just always positive. Fast forward to my first deployment in early 2012, I had questions about what it was like, the area we’d be at, the kind of operations that would go on and so forth (Nothing crazy, we were POGs) but still every question I had, he answered, no matter how much of his time I was taking up.

Unfortunately for me he wasn’t going on this deployment which kind of bummed me out, but eventually we went on some small training detachments together supporting “the cool guys”. I remember asking if he ever had any desire to be an “operator” which he had no interest in. He said “nah man, those dudes are cool and all, but I’d much rather have that time they spend doing wild shit, with my family”. You see, Adam was a man of principle, and his principles revolved heavily around his family. Fast forward a few deployments later, we were both Sargent's, running the night shift for our respective shops when he dropped a bomb on me that he re-enlisted and was heading to Hawaii.

Now it might seem weird for a guy to say “damn, I’ll miss the hell out of that dude” but it was true. Eventually he had convinced me to consider re-enlisting myself and getting sent down there if I could. Unfortunately I was selected to be a recruiter, and ultimately took a page out of his book to be with my wife at the time and try to enjoy my life much like he did. Shortly after moving to Utah, I would go through some old photos (like 3 of them cause I though pictures were dumb) and think back to the detachments where everyone would be amazed that this dude could crush a bottle of Jamison and still function, or how much this dude shaped my leadership skills/styles throughout my Marine Corps service, my Army service, and ultimately the way I think and operate as a man.

 

“Day is done, gone the sun, From the lake, from the hill, from the sky. All is well, safely rest God is nigh. Fading light, dims the sight, And a star gems the sky, gleaming bright. From afar, drawing nigh, falls the night. Thanks and praise, for our days, 'Neath the sun, Neath the stars, 'Neath the sky. As we go, this we know, God is nigh

 

“ D”

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Master Sgt.

Joshua L. Wheeler

Master Sgt. Joshua L. Wheeler, 39, assigned to Headquarters, U.S. Army Special Operations Command, Fort Bragg, North Carolina, was killed in action Oct. 22, while deployed in support of Operation Inherent Resolve Wheeler died from enemy gunfire while in combat near Hawijah, Iraq. He was born Nov. 22, 1975, in Roland, Oklahoma, and graduated in 1994 from Muldrow High School in Muldrow, Oklahoma.

Wheeler entered the U.S. Army as an infantryman in May 1995, completing his initial entry training at Fort Benning, Ga. His first assignment was with Company C, 1st Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, Fort Lewis, Washington.

In February 1997, he transitioned to Company B, 2nd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, Fort Lewis, Washington, where he served for over seven years as an infantryman, rifle team leader, squad leader, weapons squad leader, and anti-tank section leader, deploying five times in support of combat operations in Afghanistan and Iraq. Wheeler was assigned to U.S. Army Special Operations Command in 2004 and deployed 12 times in support of combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Wheeler’s military education includes the Basic Airborne Course, Ranger School, Warrior Leader Course, Static Line Jumpmaster, Military Mountaineering Course, Basic and Advanced Demolition Courses, Advanced Urban Combat Training, Advanced Marksmanship Techniques, Close Range Tactical M4 Training, Infantry Advanced Leader’s Course, the Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape (Level C) Course, Infantry Senior Leader’s, Military Free Fall Course, and the Military Free Fall Jumpmaster Course.

Wheeler’s awards and decorations include four Bronze Star Medals with Valor Device, seven Bronze Star Medals, the Defense Meritorious Service Medal, the Meritorious Service Medal, the Air Medal, the Joint Service Commendation Medal with Valor Device, the Joint Service Commendation Medal, seven Army Commendation Medals, the Joint Service Achievement Medal, eight Army Achievement Medals, the Good Conduct Medal (6th Award), the National Defense Service Medal with Bronze Service Star, the Afghanistan Campaign Medal with 3 Bronze Service Stars, the Iraq Campaign Medal with 6 Bronze Service Stars, the Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal, the Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, the Noncommissioned Officer Professional Development Ribbon (3rd Award), the Army Service Ribbon, the Presidential Unit Citation, the Valorous Unit Award (2nd Award), the Ranger Tab, the Combat Infantryman Badge, the Expert Infantryman Badge, the Master Parachutist Badge, and three Overseas Service Bars. Wheeler was posthumously awarded the Purple Heart.

 

Wheeler is survived by four sons, one with wife Ashley, and three from a previous marriage. Army Ranger Lead The Way Fund continues to keep in close contact with the family to ensure their needs are being met.

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Lance Corporal

Robert S. Greniger

 Lance Corporal Robert S. Greniger, age 21, of Greenfield, MN was killed in action on  July 12, 2011 while serving in Sangin Valley,  Afghanistan. 

 

 LCPL Greniger was serving with 2nd Combat Engineer Battalion, 2nd Marine Division, II Expeditionary Force, Camp Lejeune, NC. He was deployed to Afghanistan on March 20, 2011 with 1st Bn 5th Marines, Alpha Co. 

 

 LCPL Greniger was only 20 years old when he deployed, yet he was heavily relied upon by his peers on countless occasions and is credited with uncovering dozens of IEDs and other threats while conducting combat operations with Alpha Co, 1st Plt.

 

 “Greniger operated on a level of high self confidence that was enough to make a squad fearless and have no doubt  that they were in good hands. His loyalty and sacrifice will never be forgotten, and he will be missed always.” “He was an exemplary Marine and combat engineer who was proud of every day he walked with us.” -Cpl.Fillmore, 1st Bn 5th Marines, A Co.

 

                        “Semper Fidelis”

                    “Make Peace Or Die”

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Staff Sergeant

Kevin Matthew Pape

Staff Sergeant Kevin Matthew Pape, 30, was killed by enemy forces during a heavy firefight while conducting combat operations in Konar Province, Afghanistan on 16 November 2010.

 

SSG Pape was a squad leader assigned to 1st Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment at Hunter Army Airfield, Georgia.  He was on his sixth deployment in support of the Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom with three previous deployments to Iraq and two to Afghanistan.


SSG Pape was born 05 February 1980 in Fort Wayne, Indiana.  He enlisted in the U.S. Army in September 2005 from his hometown of Fort Wayne, Ind. He completed One Station Unit Training at Fort Benning, GA, as an Infantryman. After graduating from the Basic Airborne Course, he attended and successfully completed the Ranger Indoctrination Program.
SSG Pape graduated from the Ranger Indoctrination Program and was then assigned to Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment in April 2006, where he served as a Machine Gunner, Team Leader and Squad Leader.


His military education includes the Basic Airborne Course, Ranger Indoctrination Program, U.S. Army Ranger Course, Emergency Medical Technician Basic Course, Warrior Leader Course and the Advanced Leader Course.


His awards and decorations include the Ranger Tab, the Expert Infantryman Badge, the Combat Infantryman Badge and the Parachutist Badge. He has also been awarded the Joint Service Commendation Medal, Army Commendation Medal, Joint Service Achievement Medal, Army Achievement Medal, Army Good Conduct Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Afghanistan Campaign Medal with Arrowhead, Iraq Campaign Medal with Arrowhead, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal and the Army Service Ribbon. SSG Pape was posthumously awarded the Bronze Star Medal, the Purple Heart and the Meritorious Service Medal.


SSG Pape is survived by his wife Amelia Rose Pape, his daughter Anneka Sue, both of Savannah, GA, and his father Marc Dennis Pape and sister Kristen Michele Pape, both of Fort Wayne, IN.


As a Ranger, Pape selflessly lived his life for others and distinguished himself as a member of the Army’s premier light-infantry unit, continuously deployed in support of Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom, and fought valiantly as he served his fellow Rangers and our great Nation. He is missed dearly.

ONE FOR THE AIRBORNE RANGER IN THE SKY!


RANGERS LEAD THE WAY! 

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Senior Chief Petty Officer

Shannon M. Kent


Shannon Kent was warrior, a wife, a mother, a daughter, a sister, a friend and a team mate. She was one of the most decorated female service members to wear a uniform for this country.

Shannon joined the United States Navy in December 2003, and upon completing the two years of training to become a Cryptological Technician, volunteered as a Navy Individual Augmentee to Iraq in 2007. She was one of the first women assigned to a Joint Special Operations Task Force in Iraq during the early parts of the Global War On Terror. As her husband, CW3 (R) Joe Kent has said “She was a woman in SOF, before there were women in SOF.” Shannon quickly became a legend both within the American and Iraqi Special Operations Commands. She conducted countless HVI raids with teams, and because of her professionalism and performance, paved the way for what is now the implementation of women within SOF.

As if that wasn’t enough, upon her return from that deployment, Shannon took on a new challenge, being the first female to volunteer for and successfully pass the Naval Special Warfare Direct Support Course. She was assigned to Naval Special Warfare Support Activity 2 in Norfolk, Virginia working side by side with the SEAL teams. She deployed to Iraq in 2008, 2010-2011 and then deployed to Afghanistan in 2012-2013 where she continued to created and developed new ways ahead in “nontraditional roles” that enhanced the efforts of the teams across multiple trips.

Shannon returned home and again found another challenge to pursue. Assessing and being selected for a special missions unit. She met her husband, CW3 (R) Joe Kent during their training course. They got married Christmas Eve, 2014 and started a family. While pregnant with their first son, Shannon finished her Bachelor Degree, while still working a full time position, and continuing to advance her career. By the time their second son was born, she had finished her Master Degree in psychology.

Shannon lived life to the fullest, and was always hunting new challenges. Tough Mudders, marathons, and her passion for art kept her busy, along with being a mother of two and still performing her duties at work.

In 2016, while Joe was deployed, Shannon underwent surgery to remove cancer found on her thyroid. She was back to work within a day or two, never to be slowed down by anything life had to throw at her.

After all of the achievements Shannon had to this point in her career, she again found a new challenge in form of applying to become a doctor of psychology, with plans of helping fellow veterans who were struggling with PTSD. Due to her having had a cancer diagnosis, “Big Navy” informed her she was ineligible to apply for the program shortly after getting her letter of acceptance. Not one to back down from a fight, Shannon decided to fight the regulation and attempt to fix it, getting it pushed all the way to the U.S. Congress. She was fit to deploy, to go to combat, but according to the Navy policy, not fit to be an Officer.

With her commissioning off the table for the time being and her team getting ready to deploy again, Shannon yet again volunteered to go. It was her eighth deployment.

Senior Chief Petty Officer Shannon Kent was killed in action on 16 January 2019 in Manbij, Syria along with three other Americans.

Shannon is in large part responsible for what is now women serving in Special Operations across the DoD enterprise. She was a ground breaking individual who accomplished things most can only dream of. She was every ounce of what a professional Sailor, Senior Chief Petty Officer and service member should strive to be. She set the example for others to follow from her first day of service to her last.

Shannon Kent was warrior....a wife...a mother...a daughter...a sister...a friend...and a team mate.

She will not be forgotten.

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